Ikebana Schools
Ichiyo
Ichiyo
Ikenobo
Ikenobo
Ohara
Ohara
Saga Goryu
Saga Goryu
Sogetsu
Sogetsu
Wafu-kai
Wafu Kai
   

Saga Goryu School of Ikebana

Saga Goryu traces its beginnings to the Emperor Saga (786—842) and rho establishment of the Shingon Buddhist sect at the Emperor’s summer palace in Kyoto at Osawa lake, named Daikaku—Ji. Saga Goryu’s headquarters remain there and with the Emperor’s license is allowed to use the 16—petal chrysanthemum as its emblem. Because of its spiritual nature, Saga’s flower arranging follows well-defined rules of placement, labeling different parts referring to some of the philosophical aspects of the Buddhist universe: Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, Heaven and Knowledge. The Saga tradition uses materials that mimic their growth habits in the real world yet accentuate their beauty.

The basic philosophy of the Saga school is the aim at Saga is not only to promote the skills and techniques of ikebana, but to enhance one’s ability to recognize the delicate and sophisticated beauty of flowers and appreciate their artistic value with a new and refined sense. Saga ikebana remains traditional but vital, introducing visual and spiritual pleasure to daily life.

The current iemoto is lemoto Seifu Noguchi, Daikaku—ji Temple
4 osawa—cho, Saga, Ukyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan 616

The basic techniques and styles of the Saga school include:

SEIKA-classic, formal, using core elements of heaven, man, earth
CHABANA-key fixture in tea ceremony, nature in its pristine form
BUNJINKA-represents classic Chinese roots
HEIKA-two material, thrown-in style
MORIBANA-represents Teiko pond with seasonal changes natural scenic or chromatic, textural materials
SHOGONKA-elaborate, ceremonial, elegant
SHINSHOKA-modern, small, simple, the essence of hana


Teaching Schedule

N/A


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